MCCC MCCC MCCC
News at MCCC
MCCC
MCCC
MCCC
MyMercer
MCCC
menu bg FUTURE STUDENTS CURRENT STUDENTS ABOUT MCCC ACADEMICS STUDENT SERVICES AND FINANCIAL AID NONCREDIT COURSES AND CONTINUING EDUCATION BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL TRAINING/DEVELOPMENT YOUTH PROGRAMS & COMMUNITY menu bg
MCCC arrow News @ MCCC
line
arrow News Archive
line
arrow Social Media Directory
line
arrow Sports News
arrow Calendar - General
line
arrow Calendar - Academic & Registration
line
arrow Calendars - Student Activities
line
arrow Sports Schedules & Scores
arrow MCCC Magazine: The Viking
line
arrow e-News Newsletter
line
arrow MCCC Annual Reports to the Community
line
arrow MCCC and Foundation Audit Reports, Form 990
arrow Student Newspaper
line
arrow Faculty Spotlight
line
arrow Events
line
arrow Kelsey Theatre Schedule
MCCC
spacer
spacer
spacer spacer

Distinguished Lecture Series

Spring 2017 Semester
This lecture series is supported by an MCCC Foundation designated fund.
All lectures -- free and open to the public -- are at 12 noon in the CM Building on the West Windsor campus.
For additional information, call (609) 570-3324 or e-mail munnr@mccc.edu.

Line divider

Wednesday, February 15, 2017 - room CM109

"The One Woman Show: A New Voice in the Desegregation Movement"   [details]

Mrs. Esther Brown, a Jewish woman, led the movement to desegregate public education in the early 1950s. Thurgood Marshall called her the "One Woman Show." Unfortunately, very few people know her name. Dr. Jessica Davis, founder and president of the Faith and Public Policy Institute, Inc., establishes her role in the development of desegregation policy in public education in the contemporary public narrative on desegregation policy in the early 1950s, the challenges to the implementation of the desegregation of public education, and the local context that led to the national fight against desegregation. The significance of this historical narrative is to highlight the struggles that activists, many of whom are unsung heroes, went through to navigate the challenges that enabled the desegregation of public education in America.

Recommended by: Associate Professor Kenneth Howarth, Department of Philosophy

Line divider

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - room CM109

"The Koto: A Traditional Japanese Instrument in Present Day"   [details]

Part music performance and part lecture, composer and koto player Kento Iwasaki presents the historical and modern aspects of the koto, a traditional Japanese musical instrument. He will discuss the history of western impact on Japanese music, particularly when Japan ended its period of isolationism, as well as his own experiences learning traditional Japanese music as a composer brought up in America. He will perform excerpts of traditional pieces, as well as modern improvisations and compositions rooted in his collaborations with opera, jazz, hip hop and rock.

Recommended by: Professor Bettina Caluori, Department of English

Line divider

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - room CM107

"Prison Hospice: Dignified End of Life Care for the Aging Prison Population"   [details]

The aging of the prison population in the United States can be attributed to what some have called a perfect storm in the world of corrections. With an increase in "tough on crime" legislation, including harsher sentencing, curtailing the powers of judges, and the elimination of parole, the U.S. correctional system is finding itself saddled with a booming population of long-termers and the terminally ill. Edgar Barens, independent filmmaker and documentarian at the Jane Addams College of Social Work at UIC, will screen various excerpts from his Oscar nominated film Prison Terminal and discuss the pressing issue of providing the terminally ill prisoner with a dignified death.

Recommended by: Professor Cavit Cooley, Department of Criminal Justice

Line divider

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - room CM109

"Zika 2017: Epidemic or Just a Passing Health Scare?"   [details]

Last year's scariest health crisis involved thousands of Brazilian babies born with small heads and multiple defects: hearing loss, vision loss, swallowing and breathing difficulties, weak muscles, seizures and delayed milestones. But that was then and that was Brazil. What about here? What about now? Zika cases began to appear on the U.S. mainland in mid-2016, most contracted while traveling abroad. Then, late last summer, mosquito-borne Zika cases began to show up in Florida and other Gulf states. With cooler fall weather, mosquito seasons ended. But, local mosquitoes get busy again in April, breeding and biting. Are you at risk? Are unborn babies at risk? Is a rerun of Brazil possible here? Dr. Gilbert Honigfeld, Visiting Professor of Psychology at William Paterson University, will provide an update and analysis. He is interested in Zika primarily because of its potential impact on normal brain development and function.

Recommended by: Professor Leonard Winogora, Department of Liberal Arts

Top of page


spacer
spacer
bottom
spacer
spacer