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New York Gallery Features Works by Mercer Photography Professor Michael Dalton

9/24/12


West Windsor, N.J. -- Michael Dalton, associate professor of Photography at Mercer County Community College, recently displayed his work in a show at Fordham University's Lipani Gallery at Lincoln Center in New York City.   The show was entitled "The Unexplained Spaces Marked Off.”

A description of the exhibit notes that it is “a manifestation of where we are now in our thinking about the urban landscape, what it looks like and what it means.”

Dalton’s project, which was featured in the exhibit along with 11 other photographers, focused on the state of the landscape that once harbored the Morris Canal. The canal served as the route for bringing coal from Pennsylvania for almost 100 years until 1924, when it was abandoned and replaced by trains.  It was leased to the Lehigh Valley Railroad which had no real use for the canal, but needed the property and terminal access at both ends of New Jersey.

“These photographs are not about adding to the historical record of the canal, but about what has become of the spaces once occupied by an engineering marvel and a major artery of nineteenth century commerce long after that artery has lost its usefulness,” said Dalton.

Dalton’s project documents the entire span of the Morris Canal. However in this particular show he focused on Jersey City, which holds some of the least preserved spaces.  “The need to develop new industries and a larger housing tax base superseded any nostalgia for a lost canal,” notes Dalton.

More information on Dalton’s project can be found here.

Michael Dalton, associate professor of Photography at Mercer, recently had his work exhibited in the Lipani Gallery at Lincoln Center, in a show titled "The Unexplained Spaces Marked Off." (Photo by Michael Dalton)
Dalton’s project documents the entire span of the Morris Canal. In this particular show, he focused on Jersey City, which holds some of the least preserved historical spaces. (Photo by Michael Dalton)

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